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Monday, July 20, 2020 | History

2 edition of Lamb of God in the Johannine writings found in the catalog.

Lamb of God in the Johannine writings

John D"Souza

Lamb of God in the Johannine writings

by John D"Souza

  • 148 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by St. Paul Publications in Allahabad .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Jesus Christ -- History of doctrines -- Early church, ca. 30-600.,
  • Bible. N.T. Revelation -- Criticism, interpretation, etc.,
  • Bible. N.T. John -- Criticism, interpretation, etc.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJohn D"Souza.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBT198 .D73 1968
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxv, 176 p. ;
    Number of Pages176
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL4527668M
    LC Control Number76904995

      Nancy Guthrie in her new book, The Lamb of God Book Two in the Seeing Jesus in the Old Testament series published by Crossway explores Seeing Jesus in Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. From the Back Cover: For if you believed Moses, you would believe me; for he wrote of me. (John )/5. The Lamb of God for Leaders The Lamb of God: Seeing Jesus in Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy is an in-depth study of four of the books of the Bible written by Moses, with the goal of understanding them in the way that Jesus himself taught the disciples to read and understand the Old Testament: with him at the Size: KB.

    It is also referred to in Pauline writings; 1 Corinthians suggests that Saint Paul intends to refer to the death of Jesus, who is the Paschal Lamb, using the theme found in Johannine writings. [7] The lamb metaphor is also in line with Ps which depicts God as a shepherd leading his flock (mankind). The Lamb of God by Nancy Guthrie is a phenomenal study of finding Jesus in the Old Testament books written by Moses and how it all pointed to the ultimate king and savior, Jesus Christ. It is totally relevant to our lives and the world today, it is amazing how it all comes together to point to Christ always and forever/5(86).

      It is also referred to in Pauline writings; 1 Corinthians suggests that Saint Paul intends to refer to the death of Jesus, who is the Paschal Lamb, using the theme found in Johannine writings. The lamb metaphor is also in line with Ps which depicts God as a shepherd leading his flock (mankind).Reviews: 5. An additional possibility, however, is that because the theological focus of John’s Gospel is on the death of the Lamb of God rather than on His suffering, he omitted the suffering in the garden for literary reasons. Perhaps the divine Johannine Jesus, who rarely even grew tired or thirsty, could not easily be depicted as suffering.


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Lamb of God in the Johannine writings by John D"Souza Download PDF EPUB FB2

The whole of the Johannine writings, it may be safely assumed, belongs to the region of Asia Minor, to a school, let us say, which had its headquarters in Ephesus, and to the last quarter, or perhaps the last decade, of the first century of our era.

it is the names of the redeemed that stand from eternity in the Lamb's book of life, not the. Lamb of God in the Johannine writings. Allahabad: St.

Paul Publications, (OCoLC) Named Person: Jesus Christ; Jesus Christ. Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: John D'Souza. The Johannine use of "the Lamb of God" (Jn36) cannot support the weight of an argument associating the two writings.

The glory of God and the means by which the Son of God will be glorified are crucial to the Gospel, yet absent from Revelation, which has a quite different understanding of the vindication of the crucified Jesus. Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc History: Additional Physical Format: Print version: D'Souza, John.

Lamb of God in the Johannine writings. Allahabad: St. John, Theology of Johannine theology organizes the unifying theological subjects belonging to the New Testament literature traditionally attributed to John.

While some critics would say that a comprehensive, coherent theology may not be within reach, still we can outline those unifying themes that undergird these writings. The authorship of the Johannine works—the Gospel of John, Epistles of John, and the Book of Revelation—has been debated by scholars since at least the 2nd century AD.

The main debate centers on who authored the writings, and which of the writings, if any, can be ascribed to a common author.

There may have been a single author for the gospel and the three epistles. In the Johannine theology the more intimate aspect of God’s relationship with men is brought vividly to the forefront. The various ways in which this compares and contrasts with the Hebrew background of thought will be brought out in the course of the following discussion.

Aspects of God. God as Creator. Johannine literature is some of the most beloved, yet controversial text in the Bible. This collection gathers resources covering issues from authorship, interpretation, criticism, and application in the Gospel of John, the epistles of John, and Revelation.

J ohannine writings, beginning from the Book of Revelation, passing through the Letters and ending with the Gospel, will help us to dis­ cover Johannine ecclesiology.

I The Idea of the Church in the Book of Revelation In the Book of Revelation the word ekklesia occurs twenty times,File Size: KB. This sacrifice of a lamb was performed by the high priest who was interceding on behalf of the people and representing them before God. The concept of Jesus as the Lamb of God, the reference to the Jewish Passover throughout the book (see ; ;), and the passion narrative of Jesus express the wonder of the Gospel─ “that God.

agery anticipates its ultimate resolution. God himself reigns, and through the triumph of the Lamb introduces the new heaven and the new earth, the home of righteousness. Thus the Johannine writings constitute a microcosm of early Christianity, and a micro­ cosm of the final defining documents of bibli­ cal theology.

Lamb of God (Greek: Ἀμνὸς τοῦ Θεοῦ, Amnos tou Theou; Latin: Agnus Deī [ˈaŋ.nʊs ˈde.iː]) is a title for Jesus that appears in the Gospel of appears at Johnwhere John the Baptist sees Jesus and exclaims, "Behold the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world.".

Christian doctrine holds that divine Jesus chose to suffer crucifixion at Calvary as a sign of. John 1 - In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

"lamb" AND "of" AND "god" primary search results are listed below along with dictionary aides, FAQs, and Lexiconc. The authorship of the Johannine works (the Gospel of John, Epistles of John, and the Book of Revelation) has been debated by scholars since at least the 2nd century AD.

[1] The main debate centers on who authored the writings, and which of the writings, if any, can be ascribed to a common author. Ancient tradition attributes all the books to John the Apostle.

The actual titles of most chapters highlight Rainbow’s contention that the center of Johannine theology is God the Father (e.g. chapter five, “God’s Self-Revelation in Christ’s Work). In every chapter various topics are covered, yet with enough detail and discussion to treat each one in a substantive way.

It is also referred to in Pauline writings: 1 Corinthians suggests that Saint Paul intends to refer to the death of Jesus, who is the Paschal Lamb, using the theme found in Johannine writings. The lamb metaphor is also in line with Ps which depicts God. Although also indirectly referred to in Pauline writings, nothing in the context of 1 Corinthians directly implies that in that specific passage Saint Paul refers the death of Jesus using the same theme as in Johannine writings.

[7] The Lamb of God title has found widespread use in Christian prayers and the Agnus Dei is used both in liturgy. Text, Context and the Johannine Community adopts a new approach to the social context of the Johannine writings by drawing on modern sociolinguistic theory. Sociolinguistics emphasizes language as a social phenomenon, which can be analysed with reference not only to its broad context of culture, but also, through the use of register analysis, to its narrower context of Author: David T.

Lamb. Lamb of God. 10K likes. Lamb of God is a title for Jesus that appears in the Gospel of John. It appears at Johnwhere John the Baptist sees Jesus. Lamb of God (, Amnos tou Theou;) is a title for Jesus that appears in the Gospel of John.

It appears at Johnwhere John the Baptist sees Jesus and exclaims, "Behold the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world." Christian doctrine holds that divine Jesus chose to suffer crucifixion at Calvary as a sign of his full obedience to the will of his divine Father, as an .It is also referred to in Pauline writings; 1 Corinthians suggests that Saint Paul intends to refer to the death of Jesus, who is the Paschal Lamb, using the theme found in Johannine writings.

The lamb metaphor is also in line with Ps which depicts God as a .The authorship of the Johannine works (the Gospel of John, Epistles of John, and the Book of Revelation) has been debated by scholars since at least the 2nd century AD.

The main debate centers on who authored the writings, and which of the writings, if any, can be ascribed to a common author. Orthodox tradition attributes all the books to John the Apostle.